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Samuel Phillips Law Blog

Tag: redundancy

Employment

Redundancy Selection Criteria – KISS

Redundancy selection criteria is one of the most contentious areas within redundancy.  It need not be.  As the acronym suggests “keep it simple stupid”. You can have objective criteria (eg attendance).  You can have subjective criteria (eg attitude).  In effect, as long as the criteria you select are not utter drivel eg “karma” that is fine.  The key issue is to draw up clear guidelines of what you mean and how you score with examples.

Employment

Redundancy Selection Pools

There are no hard and fast rules about drawing up selection pools.  However the good news is, there is more than one way in which to create a selection pool and as long as your way is reasonable, that is good enough, even if there is another way that is also reasonable. The first question you ask yourself is what is the area of work that is changing?  This could be a geographic change such as closing a depot or a change in the type of work which the business is performing.

Employment

Avoiding Redundancy

The law requires you to look at means of avoiding redundancies before you proceed to them. It takes some time for the redundancy and notice costs to unwind and for wage savings to manifest themselves. Finally, when you lose staff you lose customer contacts and organisational knowledge.  Is it worth it if you are potentially going to have to recruit in the foreseeable future thereby incurring recruitment and induction costs.

Employment

The three most common types of redundancy and three most common failings

In this article, senior partner Robert Gibson explores the three different types of redundancy, including common mistakes in how employers term redundancies. Robert also details the most common types of challenge and advises on the best way to avoid the three main pitfalls facing employers.

Employment

Redundancy – starting the process

Redundancy is where you close all or part of your business or employ fewer people to run it. You begin any redundancy process by asking the question why – what has changed.  What steps have you taken already to try and save costs (bank, landlord, suppliers).  Going forward what does the “new normal” look like.  Take a little time to set down some basic facts and figures in a simple business overview.

Employment

Redundancy Appeals and New Starters

Many employers rushed to make redundancies when businesses were first ordered to close down at the start of the Coronavirus pandemic in the UK. Redundancy is a fair reason for dismissal if it is handled fairly.  Fair process includes consultation, the duty to consider suitable alternative employment (if any) and the payment of a Statutory Redundancy Payment. If the redundancy was unfair employees firstly need to contact ACAS’s Early Conciliation service and if the claim cannot be settled that way then a claim can be issued online in the Employment Tribunal.

Employment

Managing Through Financial Distress – Redundancy

A recent report by Begbies Traynor, corporate recovery and insolvency experts, suggests that as many as 494,000 UK businesses are in significant financial distress. This number of almost half a million businesses is the highest in 16 years and 81% up on figures reported in 2016. This suggests that uncertainty over the political landscape, specifically Brexit, has played a major part in the commercial downturn.

Employment

Don’t Just Book It…Plan It

On the 5th July 1841 a young Mr Cook organised a rail excursion between Loughborough and Leicester taking passengers through the Leicestershire countryside, little knowing he was forming the World's first travel agency.

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